nuala: (young)
[personal profile] nuala
When I was 10 to 15 years old I devoured everything by Andre Norton I could find. The first one of her books was bought for me from one of the english bookshops in Brussels - it was Tales of the Witch World and was a Daw paperback with a good and pulpy cover. I still have it, though it may be in storage. I've got rid of many bad teenage books[1] over the years and moves but I've never parted with my Andre Nortons - it had taken me years to track them down as Catseye seemed to be the only one of her books in print in the UK.

Tales had a few stories in it but the two long ones stick with me - one was about a woman who was pregnant after a rape and was determined to have her revenge on the man who was responsible. Things don't go quite to plan. The other was about a woman in a group marriage type society who never felt comfortable there and escapes with an outsider man who gets captured by her tribe. There's a description of a pool with sand next to it and a sort of elemental woman made from the sand, that I've always loved.

Catseye is like a distilling of her skiffy - dystopian galaxy with space travel, people in a 'Dipple' after a civil war and ancient alien artifacts. The hero ends up working for an alien pet shop and bad things happen. In fact, while trying to remember details of the plot rather than impressions, I've realised I really want to re-read it.

Anyway, all this was by way of background to asking if anyone else wants to talk about their teenage guilty reading pleasures.

[1] Anne McCaffery and Katherine Kerr. I was young, they had women characters. I am wiser now.

Date: 2005-11-17 11:21 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] halle.livejournal.com
My teenage guilty reading pleasures are all very, very guilty--God help, I read a whole bunch of awful VC Andrews books. Really horrible.

Date: 2005-11-17 11:28 am (UTC)
ext_9215: (Default)
From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com
I read several of them too. But I don't still love them the way I do the Andre Nortons - I was thinking of the books we recognise as not exactly classic writing but love nonetheless, because they spoke to us at that vulnerable book devouring stage.

Date: 2005-11-17 11:46 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] halle.livejournal.com
Ah. I actually just a few months ago bought all of the Sunfire (American historical romance series) on eBay. All of the books are long out of print, but I collected them compulsively when I was about 12ish. I think I knew that they were crap at the time, and I certainly know it now, but I love them nonetheless. (Despite the fact that they are all the same: each a different historical time period, love triangle, girl ends up choosing The Boy Who Really Loves Her For Herself.) See, my guilty pleasure if still much less cool than yours.

Date: 2005-11-17 11:35 am (UTC)
nwhyte: (Default)
From: [personal profile] nwhyte
Mine is Roger Zelazny. I still love his writing style, but I am wiser about the substance - casual macho males vs females who are either scheming or virginal. (I was particularly taken aback when I got hold of "The Illustrated Roger Zelazny" and found Gray Morrow's illustrations sexist rather than sensual.) And while the narrative depth was just right for me as a teenager, I now find him pretty shallow.

Date: 2005-11-17 11:37 am (UTC)
ext_9215: (Default)
From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com
I got given the Fantasy Masterworks collected Amber books recently and found them impossible to read. Just so dated. But I suspect I would have eaten them up if exposed to them at the right age. I remember liking Lord of Light though I no longer remember anything about it.

Date: 2005-11-17 12:16 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] leedy.livejournal.com
I remember really enjoying the Amber books in my yoof, but even at the time I remember finding them dated.

And I too read a lot of Anne McCaffrey.

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:18 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-18 11:37 am (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-18 11:49 am (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-18 11:52 am (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] once-was-eric.livejournal.com - Date: 2007-03-01 02:01 pm (UTC) - Expand

Date: 2005-11-17 11:57 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] lilitufire.livejournal.com
I loved, loved, loved Moon of Three Rings. I'm surprised they're all out of print, she was a favourite library author of mine.

I also had a big thing for Margaret Mahy when I was a pre teen. I wonder if the books would stand up on a reread...

Hmmm. Books fit through the postbox on the new house. And the nice Japanese post office has an English helpline. I kid you not.

Must.... resist....eBay....

:)

Date: 2005-11-17 12:22 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] batswing.livejournal.com
Margaret Mahy is still really popular with the teens, though I haven't read any...

Date: 2005-11-17 01:41 pm (UTC)
ext_9215: (Default)
From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com
You know, it never occured to me to try email for out of print books...

Gah, must forget I ever had that thought.

Date: 2005-11-17 11:21 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] lilitufire.livejournal.com
Quite a lot of the Hay booksearch people have websites and online forms. I probably shouldn't tell you that, though, should I?

:)

Date: 2005-11-17 01:47 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com
I lovd Catseye AND Moon of Three Rings. I liked all the ones about alien races and cats and jewels. I remember resisting her for ages basically because I like sf not fantasy. I still didn't like the Witchworld one. I fancy re reading some of then now too..

I also liked Kemlo, and Danny Dunn, and Laura's Summer Ballet and the Masha books (most ballet books, really) and Noel Streatfield of course - I pick these kind of things up in Oxfam shops occassionally and generally find that tho in terms of mores and sexism etc they're horribly out dated they still have Charm.

Date: 2005-11-17 02:04 pm (UTC)
ext_9215: (Default)
From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com
I think she wrote more sf than fantasy, or at least, my local libraries had more sf by her. But Witchworld seemed to have been the famous stuff.

I too used to insist I liked sf than fantasy. Now I just like the good stuff :)

I read Apple Bough like 20 billion times. A book about a family that traveled spoke to me for some reason :)

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:20 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:27 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] kulfuldi.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:32 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:43 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:59 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:17 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:20 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:38 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:57 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:20 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:27 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] bitty.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 04:14 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 04:43 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] bitty.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 04:55 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] kulfuldi.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-18 06:11 am (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] bitty.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-18 03:52 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] kulfuldi.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-18 04:05 pm (UTC) - Expand

Date: 2005-11-17 12:05 pm (UTC)
ext_22388: (Default)
From: [identity profile] elgoose.livejournal.com
I loved Andre Norton at that age, just loved her. My guilty pleasure from back then is Robert Heinlein, who I just find embarrassing now, for oh so many reasons.

Date: 2005-11-17 01:45 pm (UTC)
ext_9215: (Default)
From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com
I read some Heinlein in my late teens and was mostly very confused. I'm glad I never read Friday.

Date: 2005-11-17 01:48 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com
I still do re-read Heinlein juveniles as light reading when I'm ill or something. they're great page turners and the sexual politics only becomes truely appalling in the adult ones (if you sort of try not to look..)

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] armoire-man.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 04:36 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 04:40 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] lilbjorn.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 07:39 pm (UTC) - Expand

Date: 2005-11-17 12:29 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] alltheleaves.livejournal.com
My friends and I went through a stage of reading Mills & Boon because it was just fabulously hilarious. And we read anything and everything by Jilly Cooper moving on to Jackie Collins and a book called Princess Daisy although I forget the writer. And we may have even delved into a few Danielle Steeles.

Date: 2005-11-17 01:40 pm (UTC)
ext_9215: (Default)
From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com
I used to be able to speed read M&Bs in half an hour in the local library because my parents would have freaked if I'd brought them home. I don't think I've ever read a non-romance book in which a woman wears her hair in a chignon. In fact, I'm not even sure I know what one of them is.

Princess Daisy was by Judith Krantz who also did Mistral. I prefered Mistral because it didn't have the creepy brother incest. I've also read a Daniel Steele - the hero owned a vineyard. In fact, I obviously read nothing good for years :)

Date: 2005-11-17 01:49 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] alltheleaves.livejournal.com
Oh I completely refused to read anything that would please my parents through my entire teenage years. My sister was a paragon of virtue when it came to reading good books and I couldn't possibly be like her so I read anything and everything that I was told not to. Especially Just 17.

On the other hand I read a lot of the stuff my sister read back then now and I know I'm getting more out of them than I would have done at that age. My parents went on and on about her having read Anna Karenina and I finally picked it up a couple of years ago and thought it was dreadful. I phoned up my Dad and asked him what he thought of it and he said he hadn't liked it either; far too sentimental. I then asked why they made such a song and dance about my sister reading it and it was pure snobbery about her reading Tolstoy at 17.

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:20 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] kulfuldi.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:46 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:12 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] alltheleaves.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 06:07 pm (UTC) - Expand

Date: 2005-11-17 02:27 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] leedy.livejournal.com
the creepy brother incest

Oh ick, yes. What was it about 70s/80s trashy blockbusters and incest? Flowers In The Attic had it as well, didn't it? I read that on a school trip, and even though I knew it was awful, I was compelled to read on until the end, and even borrowed more of Virginia Andrews' ghastly melodramas from my classmate. I particularly remember the one with the girl who grew up in a shack and whose drunkard father sells all her siblings for booze.

Actually, isn't Virginia Andrews still writing from BEYOND THE GRAVE?

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 02:33 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:01 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:09 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:12 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] biascut.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 06:31 pm (UTC) - Expand

(no subject)

From: [identity profile] kulfuldi.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-18 12:19 pm (UTC) - Expand

Re: The Ultimate

From: [identity profile] hfnuala.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:07 pm (UTC) - Expand

Re: The Ultimate

From: [identity profile] surliminal.livejournal.com - Date: 2005-11-17 03:12 pm (UTC) - Expand

Date: 2005-11-17 04:02 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] davidfrazer.livejournal.com
Harry Turtledove (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Turtledove).

A friend recommended his novel Agent of Byzantium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basil_Argyros), which is a spy thriller set in an alternative world where Muhammed converted the Arabs to Orthodox Christianity and was sanctified as Saint Mahomet. Since there is no Islamic or Ottoman empire, Constantinople's main enemy is the Persians, and the fringes of the empire are filled with Nestorians and other esoteric heretics.

I enjoyed that, so I galloped through the Misplaced Legion series and realised that Turtledove was taking advantage of the obscurity of Byzantine history to use it as the basis of an entire fantasy world. And that is about all I can remember of it.

(Hi. We met during [livejournal.com profile] glitzfrau's meet-the-lj-friends evening in London. Hope you don't mind me dropping in.)

Date: 2005-11-17 09:05 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] fjm.livejournal.com
Guilt? Jews don't do guilt....

I read anything I could get my hands on: M&B, fantasy, fairy tales, Streatfield (Gemma and Sisters were my favourite but I also had a crush on Petrova which transferred seamlessly to Sabrina in Charlie's Angels). I never stopped reading Diana Wynne Jones, discovered sf at te age of 12 and moved almost completely over to that, and continued to collect girls school books from the 1920s and 1930s. I have the complete Chalet School collection (only in pb) and took it to University with me.

But then, I'm the person who sat sewing sequings on a fairy frock (for Iolanthe) in a Women's Group meeting because I wanted to piss them off.

Date: 2005-11-17 10:45 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] thereyougothen.livejournal.com
i think i read every single regency romance in bowie library.

every single one. even the really crap ones. i used to work in a deparmtent store from 11-9, so i would come home, read a book, fall asleep and do it all again tomorrow.

i think i would read the georgette heyers again, and there were books by patricia veryan that used to make me laugh out loud. but everything else was crap.

but not as crap as the crap my mum read.

Date: 2005-11-18 06:18 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] kulfuldi.livejournal.com
I was thinking about this, and the books I was most guilty about reading, even as a child, were 'Biggles' books - mostly because my relatives tended to mutter 'militarist, imperialist rubbish' if they saw me with one. Which was, of course, true, but not the point when you're 8 or 9. I used to lie on the ground behind the sofa to read them, so nobody could see me.

Date: 2007-03-01 02:04 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] once-was-eric.livejournal.com
Enid Blyton!

It was a while ago...

Page generated Sep. 21st, 2017 08:31 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios